Charles H. Spurgeon

1834-1892

Selected Sermons

Spurgeon Picture The Prince of Preachers

Brief Description

Title

Source

In Ezekiel, the Lord promises to give his people a "new heart." What is it, why do we need it, and how do we obtain it? Spurgeon answers these questions and shows that Calvinism and Arminianism have two diametrically opposed answers.

The New Heart

Ezekiel 36:24

Condensed (and lightly edited for clarity) from Spurgeon's Sermons, Vol. 5 (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 1996).

What was Christ's intention in dying on the cross? To provide salvation for all men? Or was it to secure salvation for the elect? The Arminian answers with the former, the Calvinist with the latter. Which is correct? Could Jesus himself provide the answer? "For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost."

The Mission of the Son of Man

Luke 19:10

Condensed (and lightly edited for clarity) from Spurgeon's Sermons, Vol. 6 (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 1996).

Paedobaptism is the belief in baptizing infants. Presbyterian, Episcopalian, Methodist, and Roman Catholic scholars all use this event in the ministry of Jesus as an argument for the paedobaptist position. However, Spurgeon, a baptist and advocate of believer's baptism, contructs a rather awkward dilemma for this argument.

Children Brought to Christ,
Not to the Font

Mark 10:14

Condensed (and lightly edited for clarity) from Spurgeon's Sermons, Vol. 8 (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 1996).

What is the doctrine of election? In this sermon, Spurgeon points out that many who argue against election argue against a false characterization of the doctrine. He explains here that once the doctrine is correctly understood, it is indeed an encouragement to sinners.

How to Meet the Doctrine of Election

Matthew 15:24-25

Condensed (and lightly edited for clarity) from C. H. Spurgeon, Miracles and Parables of Our Lord, Vol. 1 (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 2003).

All too often the evangelical message is, "God loves you and has a wonderful plan for your life!" Where does, "Take up your cross and follow me" fit in? Are we afraid to declare the hardships that will be involved in becoming a Christian? Jesus never kept back this truth from those who would follow him.

Counting the Cost

Luke 14:28-30

Condensed (and lightly edited for clarity) from C. H. Spurgeon, Miracles and Parables of Our Lord, Vol. 3 (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 2003)

Jesus explained that no king goes to war without first considering whether he is able to win. If he is not, he seeks terms of peace. Then Jesus added: "In the same way, any of you who does not give up everything he has cannot be my disciple." How does this follow? Where is the connection?

Consider Before You Fight

Luke 14:31-33

Condensed (and lightly edited for clarity) from C. H. Spurgeon, Miracles and Parables of Our Lord, Vol. 3 (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 2003)

"Come, for all things are now ready." This is a verse that should be an anchor for everyone's soul. Spurgeon explains why there is no reason for anyone not to come to Christ for salvation, nor for any Christian not to pray and rejoice in his salvation. The question is not, "Am I ready?" but "Am I willing?"

"Come, For All Things Are Now Ready"

Luke 14:17

Condensed (and lightly edited for clarity) from C. H. Spurgeon, Miracles and Parables of Our Lord, Vol. 3 (Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 2003)

"And ye will not come to me, that ye may have life" (John 5:40). Spurgeon opens his comments on this text as follows: "This is one of the great guns of the Arminians, mounted upon the top of their walls, and often discharged with terrible noise against the poor Christians called Calvinists." Does man have a free will? Which position, Arminianism or Calvinism, represents the teaching of Scripture on this question?

"Free Will -- A Slave"

John 5:40

Condensed (and lightly edited for clarity) from a booklet published by Word of Truth Publications, Canton, Georgia 30114

The return of the prodigal son--yes, this is one of Jesus' most familiar parables. But are you aware of how much this parable reveals not only about the wayward sinner but also about what Spurgeon calls "the lovely nature of Christ"? You will surely learn much from the "Prince of Preachers" as he discusses this well-known parable.

"The Prodigal's Return"

Luke 15:20

Condensed (and lightly edited for clarity) from Charles H. Spurgeon, 12 Sermons on the Prodigal Son and Other Texts in Luke 15 (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1976)

Every Christian will find encouragement from this Psalm. In his introduction to it, Spurgeon writes,

Such as receive a vile return for long kindness to others may read this song with much comfort, for they will see that it is alas! too common for the best of men to be rewarded for their holy charity with cruelty and scorn; and when they have been humbled by falling into sin, advantage has been taken of their low estate, their good deeds have been forgotten, and the vilest spite has been vented upon them.

Psalm 41

Complete from Charles H. Spurgeon, The Treasury of David

Here is another complete exposition of a Psalm by Spurgeon. In his introduction to Psalm 139, Spurgeon writes,

One of the most notable of the sacred hymns. It sings the omniscience and omnipresence of God, inferring from these the overthrow of the powers of wickedness, since he who sees and hears the abominable deeds and words of the rebellious will surely deal with them according to this justice. The brightness of this Psalm is like unto a sapphire stone, or Ezekiel's "terrible crystal." It flames out with such flashes of light as to turn night into day. Like a Pharos [lighthouse], this holy song casts a clear light even to the uttermost parts of the sea, and warns us against that practical atheism which ignores the presence of God, and so makes shipwreck of the soul.

Psalm 139

Complete from Charles H. Spurgeon, The Treasury of David


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