H. A. Boardman Picture

H. A. Boardman

1808-1880

A Treatise on the Scripture Doctrine of Original Sin

American Minister and Author

H. A. Boardman
and
The Tenth Presbyterian Church

Description

Links

Henry Augustus Boardman graduated from Yale College in 1829 and in the fall of 1830 entered Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey. At that time, the seminary was still under the leadership of its founder, Archibald Alexander. Following Alexander, the principals of the seminary were Charles Hodge (tenure 1851-1878), Archibald Alexander Hodge (tenure 1878-1886), and B. B. Warfield (tenure 1887-1902), three of the greatest theologians produced in this country. Princeton Seminary was made famous during those years for its defense of Calvinistic Presbyterianism, a tradition that became known as Princeton Theology. This was the theology of Henry Boardman.

In April 1833 Boardman was licensed to preach in the denomination that then was called the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PC-USA), and in September of that year he was called to the pastorate of the Tenth Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia, one of the churches in the PC-USA. During that time he published many books and pamphlets while continuing his pastorate at Tenth Presbyterian. In 1876 he became Pastor Emeritus. He died in 1880, leaving three sons and two daughters.

The Tenth Presbyterian Church is one of the outstanding churches in conservative presbyterian circles. It was founded in 1829 and pastored first by Henry McAuley (1829-1833). H. A. Boardman was the second senior pastor from 1833-1876. Two other well-known names in conservative circles were senior pastors: Donald Grey Barnhouse (tenure 1927-1960) and James Montgomery Boice (tenure 1968-2000). Its congregation currently is roughly 1,600 strong.

In addition to its outstanding ministers, the Tenth Presbyterian Church has maintained its conservative stance. After a merger, its denomination, the PC-USA, had become the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (UPCUSA) in 1958, and this new denomination slowly became liberal. When it allowed women ministers and also ruled that all congregations must elect both men and women to the office of ruling elder, the Tenth Presbyterian Church left the denomination in 1980 and united with the Reformed Presbyterian Church, Evangelical Synod. In 1983 it moved again and joined the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA).

This book is divided into three major sections that are called Part I, Part II, and Appendix.

This first part deals with the character and condition of man since the first sin of Adam. Boardman addresses the views on this issue that have been advocated by theologians of various diverse theologies throughout the centuries.

In Part II Boardman develops the biblical teaching on the imputation of Adam's sin. Following this, he critiques the various alternative views.

In the appendix Boardman addesses the arguments of contrary views of theologians in additional--and great--detail.

This book is worthy of careful study. It explains and defends the biblical position on these two issues.

The bibliographic data for this book is as follows:

Boardman, H. A.   A Treatise on the Scripture Doctrine of Original Sin, 3rd ed. (Philadelphia: Presbyterian Board of Publication, 1844)

Part I:
Native Depravity

Part I:
Native Depravity

(With Modernized English)

Part II:
Imputation

Part II:
Imputation

(With Modernized English)

Appendix

Return to Biblical/Theological Studies


© Copyright 2019 Rediscovering the Bible. All Rights Reserved. | Contact Us | Email Webmaster